WEF Report #3: Unlocking the Value of Personal Data!

[This is cross posted on the PDEC blog - http://pde.cc/2013/03/wef-report-3/]

The World Economic Forum released its third major report about Rethinking Personal Data: Unlocking the Value of Personal Data: From Collection to Usage. PDEC has worked with the WEF’s Rethinking Personal Data project since before its first gathering in the Summer of 2010. It is really gratifying to see this third report come out and continue to move the issue forward.

The Rethinking Personal Data work is now within a larger umbrella WEF’s calling “Hyperconnectivity,” lead by Bill Hoffman, the original steward of the Rethinking Personal Data project.

Unlocking’s executive summary highlighted what PDEC member startups have been building:

New ways to engage the individual, help them understand and provide them with the tools to make real choices based on clear value exchange.

and the path forward of

Needing to demonstrate how a usage, contextual model can work in specific real world application.

The report says we must solve simplicity and elegance of design for usability so people can see the data generated by and about them.
The last part of the executive summary calls for “stakeholders to more effectively understand the dynamics of how the personal data ecosystem operates. A better coordinated way to share learning, shorten feedback loops and improve evidence-based policy-making must be established.”
The Rethinking Personal Data project convened six face-to-face events leading to the report. I participated in four of them in 2012 on behalf of PDEC: March in San Jose, June in London, September in Tianjin, and October in Brussels.

One of the meetings’ themes was the challenge to rise to the Fair Information Practice Principles. The US FTC‘s FIPPs were written in the 1970’s when citizens raised concerns to Congress about how they were ending up on catalogue mailing lists. This offline model is not an ideal basis for how to address the economic opportunities of personal data and the challenges it presents today.

The second chapter covers the context of data use, where everything surrounding data use affects people’s privacy expectations and the choices of institutions using their data. It’s great seeing this level of nuance brought to a general business audience.

This report is notable for highlighting the role of the personal data store in initatives put forward by the UK, French and US governments that mandate Data Handbacks, that data created by an individual when transacting with a government or business should be given back to the individual.

 

A few paragraphs stand out for me in looking ahead and the opportunity for PDEC companies.

Potentially, markets can encourage a “race to the top” in which user control and understanding of how data is used and leveraged become competitive differentiators. Various trust marks and independent scoring systems will help stimulate this kind of response.

Given the complexity of choices, there is also potential for the development of “agency type” services to be offered to help individuals. In such a scenario, parties would assist others (often for a commission or other fee) in a variety of complex settings. Financial advisers, real estate agents, bankers, insurance brokers and other similar “agency” roles are familiar examples of situations when one party exercises choice and control for another party via intermediary arrangements. Just as individuals have banks and financial advisers to leverage their financial assets and take care of their interests for them, the same type of “on behalf of” services are already starting to be offered with respect to data.

The last section of the report outlines thirteen different use-cases for personal data by a range of stakeholders, including two PDEC startup circle companiesPersonal and Reputation.com.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Super Trip Review from NSTIC to RSA

I’ve been on two super trips recently.  One went from before American Thanksgiving to early December. This last one was much of February beginning with NSTIC and ending with RSA. I wrote this in pen and paper last week and typed it up today.

One way I manage to get around is to piece together what could only be considered “super trips” – 18 days.

I actually started off at home on Feb 2nd helping Van Riper run the Community Leadership Summit West. Its an unconfernece for mostly technical  community leaders but also managers but was inclusive of other community based community leaders. I will have a blog post about it up on my Unconference.net site.

February 4th I headed to NSTIC’s 3rd plenary in Phoenix. I presented the results of the Holistic Picture Visualization Sub-Committee printing out the images we found online.  Bob Blakley and Brett McDowell did a good job shaping the agenda and inviting plenary participants to connect with the big vision of NSTIC of 10 years out.

  • All implementation actions are complete, and all required policies, processes, tools, and technologies are in place and continuing to evolve to support the Identity Ecosystem.
  • A majority of relying parties are choosing to be part of the Identity Ecosystem.
  • A majority of U.S. Internet users regularly engage in transactions verified through the Identity Ecosystem.
  • A majority of online transactions are happening within the Identity Ecosystem.
  • A sustainable market exists for Identity Ecosystem identity and attribute service providers.

While at the same time reminding on the way to getting a man on the Moon we got a Monkey into the Ionosphere – so what is our monkey in an Ionosphere – at the plenary groups were invited to articulate this:

  • Relying parties from multiple sectors are demonstrating identity and strong authentication credential interoperability
  • Is easier to use than the broken user account and password methods
  • Licensed professionals now have a common way to express credentials and ongoing certification.   No longer do licensed professionals need to scan, fax or otherwise send paper copies proving their qualifications every time another client seeks to retain their services.
  • allows citizens to securely establish a multi-purpose single identity that will significantly reduce, and eventually eliminate, the need to create and maintain multiple passwords and PINs.
  • Secure web accounts for use in circles of on line providers by 10 banks, 15 insurance companies and 25 hospitals.

[Read more...]

NSTIC in six simple parts

One of the challenges with the whole NSTIC thing is that it has a bunch of different parts. I wrote up this description as part of our What could Kill NSTIC paper.

NSTIC National Program Office. The NSITIC NPO operates within the Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards. It is lead by Jeremy Grant. The office has several full time staff and they are responsible for the transition of NSTIC from a US government initiative to an independent, public- private organization. They’re smart, talented, and they care.

Identity Ecosystem Steering Group (IDESG). The NPO invited many people, NGOs, government bodies, and companies to participate in building an identity ecosystem in the Identity Ecosystem Steering Group. All the people and organizations who sign up to be a part of this are together called “The Plenary.” The NSTIC NPO wrote IDESG’s charter and its first bylaws.

IDESG Management Council. The IDESG management council is elected by the members of the plenary who self-selected into stakeholder categories. Each stakeholder category elects a delegate to the Management Council. The entire plenary also elects two at-large positions and two leadership positions. The management council can create sub-committees to get its work done. I’m chaired one that collected holistic ecosystem pictures, for example.

Committees within the IDESG Plenary. These committees do the actual work of making the identity ecosystem’s vision a reality. New committees can be proposed by any member. Committee membership is open to all plenary members. The work and activity of the committees is shared openly. A few of the active committees are working on standards, privacy, trust frameworks, accreditation, and nymrights.

The Secretariat. The NSTIC NPO awarded a $2.5 million dollar contract to provide support services to the Identity Ecosystem Steering Group. Trusted Federal Systems won the contract to act as the IESG’s “Secretariat.” They coordinate meetings, manage listservs, and the like.

NSTIC Pilot Projects. In early 2011, the National Program Office put forward $10 million in funding for five pilot projects that worked to solve some of NSTIC’s challenges. Grants were awarded in September 2012 and run for one year. The pilot projects were set up before the IDESG existed and the IDESG had no input into the selection of the the winning pilots. 187 different initial pilot projects applied for grants, 27 were selected to submit full proposals, and five were selected. Applications for a second round of pilots are coming in Q1 2013.

Help co-create the Data Seder

Here is how I put forward the idea to a friend…

Me: Hey, so you know about Passover?

A: Yes, there is a meal… and its a jewish holiday

Me: Yes, its a religious service over a meal to retell the story of the jews escaping from Slavery in egypt 1000’s of years ago.

It is a celebration of Freedom.

We are uptdating it for the contemporary struggle to free our data.

We want to raise consciousness about current data practices through a modern version of the Seder Meal

Join us on our mailing list (and soon on the wiki)

I am also going to be seeking input from leaders of multiple faiths about what their tradition has to say about identity and data rights in the digital age. Feel free to contact me if you know a faith leader we might approach for such a statement.

There will be a physical seder in Oakland – but we are hoping the service we develop can happen all over.

 

What could Kill NSTIC? PDEC White Paper Released

My colleague at the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium, Phil Wolff, hosted sessions at the last two IIW‘s that invited community consideration of the risks to NSTIC. He has put together a paper that outlines the results of these two sessions that were titled “Death to NSTIC” the white paper is “What Could Kill NSTIC: A Friendly Threat Assessment”. He has a video about it and you can download it from our website. 

It also has a Bonus Section I wrote that:

  • Explains some of the background of NSTIC
  • Articulates the 6 main parts of NSTIC and what they do
  • Explains the relevance of NSTIC to the companies in the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium.

I’m running for Mayor* again!

I’m planning on running for Mayor * again (a position on the NSTIC Steering Group Management Council) – this time for a different “municipality” (delegate representative).

Currently I am the Consumer Advocate delegate – I’m going to shift my membership and join the IDESG with my hat as Executive Director of PDEC and run for the Small Business and Entrepreneur delegated on the Management Council.

If you want to be a part of the IDESG and VOTE in this round of elections you MUST register by February 14th.   [Read more...]

European Workshop on Trust & Identity in Feb

I’m going to Vienna in Febuary to work with Rainer and Marks on an event they are pulling together (and invited me to help with).

The European Workshop on Trust and Identity 

February 12-13 in Vienna.

Registration is here.

Internet identity, identity federation and personal data online are complex, continually evolving areas. The event is inspired by similar events such as the Internet Identity Workshop(external link) in California, Identity North in Canada, and Identity Next in the Netherlands, with a focus on European perspectives and initiatives. At EWTI participants will seek deeper understanding, and better solutions to challenges like:

  • Technology. Developing feasible and open standards.
  • Trust Frameworks. Establishing new paradigms and policy sets.
  • Usability. How can users navigate different identities and understand their data?
  • Economy. How can identity services fit into businesses requirements and opportunities for all stakeholders?
  • Interoperability. On which levels and areas is interoperability necessary or feasible? This is a cross-cutting concern for technical, legal and business views.
  • Deployment and operation. How can different options be supported and exploited in the best way, given the whole range of places and devices.
  • EU project challenges. The European Commission’s projects related to trust and identity like STORK and eID regulation are landmarks on the roadmap. How do other actors relate to and utilize those projects?

Besides discussing specific topics in the above areas, there will also be plenty of opportunities for networking among solution providers and seekers, startups, investors and technology pundits. EIW provides a place where skilled people from a wide range of functions and projects in the identity ecosystem gather and work intensively for two days. The unconference format puts into the foreground what is important for the participants. How much attention topics receive is driven by active participation. Results will be collected and published at the and as proceedings. After the brief introduction on the first day there are no formal presentations, no keynotes, no panels. What happens then? We will make the schedule when we are face to face the first day of the conference. We use a method called Open Space Technology to support unconference where the topics most important to the participants that day are discussed. How much attention topics receive is driven by active participation. This supports a self-organized and self-responsible group unleashing the great creativity and passion of the participants. Results from sessions will be collected and published at the end as proceedings.

Communicate Across Initiatives

There are numerous IDM-related efforts and projects in both private and public sector. EIW is a place for direct talks skipping hours of time-consuming powerpoint presentations. Take the opportunity to form the contents yourself!

Next Events in early 2013

I’m working on a few key focused things this year (more on that in the next post). One of them is being more proactive in posting where I am going to be.
This post has events of three types for the next 2 months.
Black BOLD: Will be attending
Red BOLD italics: Helping to Organize and will be attending/leading
* Interesting I wish I could go – not likely too.
I’m also sharing below that events I know I will be attending for the rest of the year – the interesting event post for the rest of the year.
* Cloud Computing Workshop and Big Data Forum, Gaithersburg, Maryland, January 15 – 17, 2013
* Strata Online, DataWarefare, January 22
* State of the Net Conference, Washington DC, January 22 – 23, 2013
NymRights Meeting at SudoRoom, Link, Wednesday January 23rd
Discussing the development of a Name Policy, generally AND put it forward into the NSTIC conversation

Online Community Manager Meetup link  San Francisco, January 23rd 

The core of this community are some amazing people who I really love and share the professional practice of doing community management online. Randy Farmer, Gail, Susan Tenby [personal hero for testifying before congress pro-social good use of second life and pro-nym and then having that picked up by the Daily Show, ] Bill Johnston, ,

* Cloud Security Alliance, Bay Area, January 24th

* Streams, Gardens, and Clouds: Visualizing Dynamic Data for Engagement, Education and the Environment: A CITRIS Data and Democracy Event to Celebrate Data Innovation Day link, Berkeley, January 24th

She’s Geeky!!!! link Bay Area – Mountain View, January 25-27

I am super excited about this year – we have the amazing Kas Nettler executive producing. There are a bunch key topics and conversations I want to have including about

  • NSTIC – and getting involved for regular folks
  • Nym Rights,
  • Transgender Identity Issues Online,
  • Community and Conference Diversity including educating allies,
  • Considering possibility of doing healing circles in hacker/technical comunities.
* CFP Mini Conference in DC, January 28th
* Green Data Center Conference, San Diego, January 29-31
* Research Exchange talk by Tim O’Reilly at CITRUS, January 30th

Personal Cloud Evening Link in San Francisco, last week in San Francisco

Working with Johannes, Adrian, Adam along with PDEC members coming in from out of town Phil Windley and Drummond Reed.  It looks like an exciting line up.
* Computers, Privacy and Data Protection, Brussels, January 23-25

FEBRUARY

Community Leadership Summit linkSan Jose, 

Van Riper is the Community Leader – community leader.

NSTIC IDESG Face to Face, Phoenix, Feb 5-7

First of all you can register here – this will be the 3rd. I’ll write more soon about NSTIC
* Lift Conference, Geneva, Feb 6-8

European Identity Workshop, LINK, Vienna, Feb 12-13

I’m working with Rainer Hober and Markus Sabedello to put this Unconfernece on. I’m really excited about it.
* Personal Digital Archiving, Maryland, Feb 21-22nd
* Wisdom 2.0, February 21-24th
* Future of  Banking Summit, Paris,  Feb 26th
* Strata Conference, Santa Clara, Feb 26 – 28th,

RSA Conference, San Francisco, Feb 25 – 29th

* Network & Distributed System Security Symposium,  San Diego, Feb 25-27,
Hosted by the Internet Society
 *  Public Interest Environmental Law Conference PIELC, Eugene, Feb 28 – March

APRIL

Harvard Leadership Program with YGLs, link, Cambridge, April 2-12th

Future of Money and Technology, link, San Francisco, April ? 

UnMoney Convergence, link, San Francisco, April ?

MAY

Internet Identity Workshop #16, Mountain View, May 7-9

JUNE

YGL Summit Mayanmar, and WEF East Asia link June 2 – 7 

JULY

Cloud Identity Summit, link, Napa, July 8 – 12
Hollyhock Invitational, link Cortez, July 

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

Digital Enlightenment Forum,  Europe, September 16-18,

OCTOBER

Interent Identity Workshop #17, link, Mountain View, October

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

Looking Ahead to 2013

The month of January I’m spending at home in the Bay Area and focused on a few key things:

  • Working with Phil Wolff and Jean Russell on key systems for the Personal Data Ecosystem Consortium with an emphasis on the Startup Circle, Personal Cloud Gathering around the country, Educational Seminars and preparing to launch the Open Protocol Wire (to track all the open protocols relevant to the emerging space).
  • Doing year long planning and business development for the Unconference design, facilitation and production company with Bill Aal, Jennifer Holmes and Jean Russell.
  • Visioning how all the interests and themes I have been engaged with in my life’s work are woven together in this coming year – a few more posts will follow to share current ideas/reflections.
The year will include:
  • Focusing on my personal human form sustainability and happiness.
  1. Including making space for bodily healing and regeneration
  2. moving and exercising
  3. growing my relationships with my chosen family
  4. spending quality and extended time with good friends
  5. making time for my art
  6. creating a beautiful and nurturing home environment
  7. having time to think and be away from home
  8. completing life homework (paperwork) that has been put off to long
  9. consciously connecting to my spiritual self
  10. reflecting and connecting with my ancestors and sharing more about them online
  • Growing the Personal Data Ecosystem into a Thriving Community and Organization Supporting it. 
  1. Spending more time with the Personal Data Ecosystem startups and growing the number we serve.
  2. Offering Seminars to get individuals, companies and funders up to speed.
  3. Getting great informational synthesis systems in place for news updates, white papers, events etc.
  4. Developing peer educational opportunities across the ecosystem (podcasts, webinars etc).
  5. Growing the number of Personal Cloud Meetups happening
  6. Helping coordinate joint activities and conversations including engaging with governments as they look at regulation.
  7. Working with Evan Prodromo and others on making real mutli-code base, open standards based interoperable Federated Social Web.
  8. Developing some socially responsible investing SRI and Corporate Social Responsibility guidelines for technology that go beyond “is the electricity in your data center green”
  9. Figuring out how
  • Engaging with the NSTIC process including attending the Phoenix meeting in early February (you are invited too). 
  1. Working with Aestetix on the NymRights efforts within and beside NSTIC.
  2. Completing the work of the holistic picture subcommittee I lead and seeing what is next.
  3. Working on getting citizen advocates who are diverse engaged in the  process
  4. Continuing to advocate for and provide ideas about how to actually put into practice inclusive, easy to participate in processes for NSTIC that get input from a broad range of stakeholders AND create enough space for industry folks used to enterprise identity management to actually “get” that this isn’t about employee provisioning and termination.
  5. Inviting a focus within NSTIC to listening and responding to the complex system of the existing and emerging identity ecosystem rather then pursuing “plans” developed in committees of self appointed experts.
  6. Considering running again for the NSTIC Management Council seat in the elections coming up this spring.
Connecting & working with Young Global Leaders and WEF 

Facebook’s Problem = FSW Opportunity

ReadWriteWeb’s social Blog has an articule up referencing a conversation the author had with Mark Cuban about Facebook’s business model and integrity challenges.

Apparently Facebook is now going to charge brands a huge amount to reach the base of fans they have accumulated on facebook.

I’ve heard anecdotally about a huge brand that was complaining recently because it has spent four years building a following of millions of people, promoting its Facebook presence (and, by implication, Facebook itself) on expensive television ads – and now Facebook has flipped a switch and, overnight, their reach dropped by 40%.

So now they’re done. They’ve been burned, and, like Cuban, they’re looking elsewhere.

A few weeks back I as in a tweeted to a woman complaining how Facebook was shaping which of her friend’s updates she saw and even asking her to pay money to have her updates go to more of her friends. I said that when we had a federated social web she wouldn’t have this problem we would choose which of our friends we would follow and get updates from.

I attended my 3rd out of three federated social web summits last week eek it feels like last week it was 2 weeks ago just after IIW 15. Evan Prodromo pulled together an amazing group of folks working on key aspects of the challenge.

Phil Wolff and I presented about the emerging Personal Cloud offerings coming out of our community of companies (the Personal Data Ecosystem Startup Circle)

Tantek shared POSSE – Publish On your Own Site Syndicate Everywhere.

Even gave an update on where OStatus the stack of protocols that gives you twitter and facebook like functionality across services.

We learned about many other projects. too (you can see them on the wiki here).

I’m glad that folks like Mark Cuban are waking up to the fact there is an issue with Facebook and they should be looking elsewere. Facebook is to social what AOL and Compuserve were to e-mail. It will be disrupted by the Open Standards based infrastructure must of it based on Open Source code. People will have their own personal node on the network – a personal cloud where they will connect to others and to organizations they want to share with, connect with and do business with.

It would be great to see some big investments in core open infrastructure that can then be leveraged to make money afterwards. This is what Doc Searls is always saying you make money because of it not with it.  We need the web to continue extending to being the type that Nobody Owns, Everyone can Use it and Anyone improve it.  Open Standards are the key to this. I argue they are more important then open source code alone (look at diaspora open source but rolled its own way of doing things…and didn’t interoperate with other projects/efforts doing similar things)

If you were to ask me what would get us to the future fastest though it is open source implementations of those open standards are invaluable and what “investors” like Mark Cuban and others who are now seeing the danger of one company “owning” the social profiles and identities of a billion people should consider funding now with no strings attached.

I was asked by an investor group that I gave a day long briefing to about the the emerging Personal Data Ecosystem. I said I would give Evan Prodromo 12 million dollars no strings attached (as in you are not seeking a return on the money with more money) the deliverable for that money would be a working federated social web in 1 year. On that web one can build a huge variety of businesses and services in new ways not possible on today’s web (or at least not possible without creepy stalking and trackers and paying middle men like facebook to talk to your “fans”).  That web itself…shouldn’t be “owned” it needs to be created though.

 

 

 

 

IDESG: Governance beyond “us” Challenge 2 for NSTIC

Second Challenge:  How are we meaningfully and regularly checking in with those outside the community of self selected stakeholders – to regular citizens who have to use the currently broken systems we have today and hopefully will be enthused and inspired to adopt the outcomes of this whole effort?

The openness of NSTIC overall was inspired by the Open Government memo (http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/TransparencyandOpenGovernment)  signed first day in office. It inspired a lot of my colleagues in the dialogue and deliberation community. (Yes, I have another life/carreer doing facilitation see http://www.unconference.net)

They went to work figuring out how to be sure that coherent resources and tools were available to those who were now mandated to “do” open government and have more public participation would have really good resources available.  Tom Atlee the person I co-wrote the Governance section of my NOI was one of the leaders of this working with the NCDD (the National Coalition for Dialogue and Deliberation) to define 7 core principles of public engagement.

Blog post that outlines them: (http://ncdd.org/rc/item/3643)

[Read more...]

IDESG Governing “us”: Challenge 1 for NSTIC

I am posting to this blog the two posts I made to the NSTIC IDESG governance list on Tuesday. Here is the first one on Governing “us” (that is the word “us” not U.S.)

I only got on the [governance] list over the weekend despite raising my hand to be a part at some point in the Chicago meetings.

I am working to track all that is being discussed and I also want to breath and step back a bit. I want to share two bigger challenges and perspectives.

First Challenge how are we we connecting/structuring and governing the interested stakeholders who ARE showing up to engage.  How are we as Bob just asked creating ways, systems, processes and tools forward to create alignment and agreement?

Second Challenge  How are we meaningfully and regularly checking in with those outside the community of self selected stakeholders – to regular citizens who have to use the currently broken systems we have today and hopefully will be enthused and inspired to adopt the outcomes of this whole effort?

They are two quite different but related challenges. This e-mail will deal with challenge 1. The next one with Challenge 2.

[Read more...]

Consensus Process and IDESG (NSTIC)

In my governance NOI response I proposed several different methods be used to solicit input from a wide variety of stakeholders and bring forward from those processes clear paths for making a real strategy that take input from a wide range of stakeholders.

When the first governance drafts came out of the NPO, they articulated that the steering committee would operate via consensus BUT then it also articulated a whole set of voting rules for NOT abiding by consensus.

When I asked about their choice of using the term consensus to define a particular methodology – they came back and said well we didn’t actually mean to suggest the use of a particular proces.

But consensus IS a process method I said…and they said we didn’t mean to proscribe a method. So we were sort of in a loop.

Now that we are in this stage that is considering governance and systems for the community of self identified stakeholders (and people beyond this group who will be the users of the outputs).  What I don’t know is if people really know what real consensus process is or if we have anyone who is experienced in leading actual consensus processes? It keeps feeling to me like we are using Roberts Rules of Order and then getting everyone to agree – thus having “consensus”.  That isn’t consensus process.

Tree Bressen who was the leader of the Group Pattern Language project (I participated along with many others in its development) has an amazing collection of resources about conensus process including a flow chart of consensus process and Top 10 mistakes to avoid them.

Are we using consensus process?

One of the big issues of our democracy today (in the liberal west broadly) is that we have this tendency to believe that “voting” is the thing that makes it democratic. Voting is a particular method and one that by its nature sets up an adversarial dynamic. There are other methods and ways of achieving democracy and we can go well beyond the results of our current systems by using them. Tom has done a lot of research into them over the years at the Co-Intelligence Institute and has published two books The Tao of Democracy and Empowering Public Wisdom. 

I am glad methods outside what has been the normative frame of “Roberts Rules of Order” as Democracy are being considered…however we need to be clear on what processe we are using.

 

 

 

NSTIC Governance….Privacy Interests

This past weekend I finally got onto a bunch of mailing lists for NSTIC including the governance one. (you can too)

It is a generally accepted best practice that governance systems should be developed by the communities that need to live by them. With NSTIC the stakeholders were handed a charter and bylaws created (primarily driven by the vision of one guy) in the NSTIC National Program Office.  They kept saying “there is consens” around the charter and bylaws…but there wasn’t they were sort of thrust upon us and not developed by us.  We chose to accept them for now and are now in the process of re-visiting the bylaws handed to us and we agreed to for a short period to get things going.

The draft by-laws include a privacy standing committee that has veto power over the outcomes of Identity Ecosystem Steering Group.

[Read more...]

Kaliya for Mayor!…nope NSTIC

Update August 18th: 

Thank you to all the people and organizations who vote for me in the NSTIC election – I WON! .  I ran with my association to Planetwork and I am the Consumer and Citizen Advocate delegate for the next 6 months on the Management Council of the Steering Committee of the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace. You can learn more about my candidacy and the election on this post.  You can track the group/community progress at IDEcosystem.org.

I will be working hard with the AARP to grow the number of citizen and consumer advocate groups who are participating in the NSTIC process.

Original Post:

I’m Running for Mayor NSTIC!
Learn how to vote for me and get involved at Kaliya for Mayor .org

Here is the video!

[Read more...]

Real Names vs Nyms at Quora & Unconferences

I am again in a #nymwar [wikipedia & Botgirl's Scoop.it] situation that I actually care about. I have been denied full participation in Quora for a long long time now because my last name was listed as IdentityWoman (ironically my answer to why having control over your identity and personal data online matters did go through but then was put into suspension when they insisted on changing my name to a WASPonym).

Now there is a thread all about an unconfernece for women of Quora and they have mentioned both Unconference.net my business and She’s Geeky that I founded in the threads. I for this one important conversation bow to the “feudal lord”  of Quora as their humble “content producing servent” share my so-called real name…and help them have a good unconference and raise the issues of real name requirements within the context of real human beings who engage with the site all the time and hopefully staff as well.  Until we have the freedom to choose our names for public interactions on the web – to define our own identities based on our context and how we wish to appear where – we do not live in a free society.

 

Before they “banned” me for having the wrong color skin name. I got to write an eloquent to this question (posted below since it isn’t on their site).

Why does owning one’s own online identity and personal data matter?

and was voted to the top (with 5 votes) by others…but now that answer isn’t there cause I didn’t use my real name.

So now you can’t see it…this is akin to not letting me sit somewhere in a public space because the color of my skin is the wrong one OR I happen to sit in a wheel chair to get around and there isn’t room in our restaurant and they are in violation of American’s with Disabilities Act.

The women of Quora are talking about organizing an unconfernece and found two of my organizations/sites and are enthusiastic about them. I am totally unable to talk to them about their ideas or my sites unless I pass their “real names” test….you know like a pole tax … that Bob and I talked about in our Cloud Identity Summit closing Keynote about Identification and Social Justice (slides and videos will be online soon).

My answer to:

Why does owning one’s own online identity and personal data matter?

We own our own bodies – we have freedom and autonomy to move around the physical world.  We have rights and freedoms; If our physical lives are terminated there are consequences.

In the digital world many people are not the primary “owner” of their own identity (in digital space the equivalent of a physical body is a persistent identifier like an e-mail address or a URL or phone number).  Most people’s identity on the web is “under” terms and conditions of a private company and they can terminate people’s accounts, their identities, without recourse.

Many companies with which people have their identities “under” choose to in exchange for providing identity provisioning services and things like e-mail. They also track and aggregate user’s activities on their services and across the web via cookies and other beacons.  This profile of activity has real value and is being used by the companies to profile them and then sell abstract versions of the profile information on ad exchanges.

Some have said we live in an age of digital feudalism, where we are serfs on the lords’ manors (the large web portals).

Having the freedom and autonomy to choose who we are online and how we express ourselves is important to ensuring a free society  with rights and liberty.

Adding some more: About one’s social graph… The links in your social graph in the current architecture of the web exist within particular contexts – you have friends in Facebook or Followers on Twitter or Professional Contacts on LinkedIN. Those links, those connections in a “social graph” are ulitmately owned by the company within which you made those links. If you choose to leave any one of those networks – all your links to those people are terminated.

This is an architecture of control. You are locked into those systems if you don’t want to loose the links to others in them. To own your own identity would be to have an identity that would give you the freedom to not loose the links to your contacts, they would be peer to peer autonomous of any particular service.

The next time there is a major social revolution like in Egypt governments are not going to try and turn of the internet or mobile phone system it is likely they will simply call facebook ans ask them to terminate the accounts of dissidents.

 

 

Summer -> Fall Talks/Plans

Today is my first talk for the summer. I am speaking at the Berkeley Cybersalon with a great cast of characters. Lost and Found on the Social Web.

I head to Europe on Wednesday; you can see the outline for that trip here: European Travel and Podcasts this Summer

I return on the 27th and speak the next day at the  SDForum Women’s SIG on the topic of Women, Identity and Data – exploring what women want in these realms. It will be interactive.

I will be travelling to Portland for the Community Leadership Summit on July 14 and 15th along with my Unconference.net partner Bill Aal.

I head to Denver/Vail for the Cloud Identity Summit July 16-19th and will be giving the closing Keynote with Bob Blakley on Identity and Social Justice.

The WEF Young Global Leader Silicon Valley Summit 2.0: Shaping the future of entrepreneurship and innovation is July 25-27th. You can see the outline of the program here – it focuses on Google, Facebook and Zynga. I’m hoping we can also connect with some open source and open standards efforts.

August is currently open and will likely involve a trip to/through the NorthWest (Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Salt Spring, Hollyhock)

September is “Summer Davos” in China where there may be some programmatic activity covering the Personal Data Ecosystem.

October is the National Coalition for Dialogue and Deliberation national conference in Seattle. I plan to put in a proposal/workshop covering online identity and the nuances/issues surrounding it.  For those of you who have been tracking my work, this community is the world’s leading forum (+Canadian Equivalent C2D2) for truly innovative, deliberative public methods that provide the opportunity for collective wisdom to come forward.  It is these types of methods that we need to solve the “NSTIC governance” challenges relative to a complex system.  I worked with one of their leading members, Tom Atlee, founder of the Co-Intelligence Institute, on the chapter in my NSTIC response about governance.

The INTERNET IDENTITY WORKSHOP is October 23-25!

We are working with the W3C on having the Federated Social Web Summit be the day before October 22nd somewhere near IIW.

Identity.Next in The Hague is Nov 21-22; hopefully it will have an unconference within it.

I have been invited to speak in Brussels on November 29th.

 

European Travel and Podcasts this Summer

I’m heading to Europe on Wednesday.  The travel plans and events are below. One of the main reasons I am going is to connect with the people and communities in Europe working on identity and personal data.  I want to come back with about 10 podcasts recorded with key people from the community that I meet along the way – these will be edited on my return and posted on the web publicly.

I will also be inviting/encouraging participation with PDEC in the two main ways we have so far to engage.

* If you are a startup or a proejct focused on how people are in charge of their personal data you can apply to be part of the Startup Circle.

* If you are in an enterprise or just interested you can subscribe to the Journal.

Please don’t be afraid to reach out and connect with me if you are in Europe or know some folks in Europe I should be sure to connect with on this trip. Kaliya@pde.cc  txt:510472-9069  Skype: Identitywoman

TRAVEL PLANS:

  • June 7th I arrive in London and have meetings/social things
  • June 11th is an Identity, Personal Data & Personal Clouds Unconference I am facilitating and Tony Fish is organizing – You’re INVITED!
  • June 12th is the OIX Event
  • June 12-13th is New Digital Economics
  • June 14th is WEF Tiger Team Day
  • June 15-17 Netherlands
  • June 18-19 is the Digital Enlightenment Forum
  • June 20th I plan to travel to Paris
  • I might travel to Geneva..
  • June 25-27th in Berlin
  • June 27th I fly out of Berlin to SF.

Info Sharing Agreements! Support it! Make it Real!

Joe Andrieu and the Information Sharing Working Group has put a lot of work and effort into creating a Standard set of Information Sharing Agreements represented by a standard label. They want to invest in user -research to make it really work.

I am putting in $100 and I encourage all of you to do the same. They need to raise $12000 in the next 8 days.

See the Kickstarter Campaign here.

UnMoney Convergence Topics

Tomorrow is the UnMoney Convergence – an un-conference about all sorts of topics related to money, currency, land, value, reputation, identity.

Here are the topics that people are hoping to discuss:

  • Collaborative Consumption and Sharing
  • new currencies
  • How we can work together to make the movement for community currencies stronger and more synergistic.
  • BACE Timebank- open source currency
  • What are the best ways we can move from the current debt based, imperial economic system towards a life serving, peaceful, gift economy?
  • where are the most inspiring, promising, transition currencies being conceptualized, implemented, how can we work together to help them go viral and allow people to move their money from the old system towards creating a better alternative structure.
  • Fostering robust public debate on creating “public money” so that legitimate governments can fund activities which serve people and planet rather than threaten them.
  • Deep Wealth and new currencies as an emerging language of value. A Living Systems Model of Wealth
  • The role of co-operatives in startup investment.
  • how to enable trust agility?
  • governance, mobile payments oauth/opentransact
  • Designing Intentional Community Economic Systems
  • “Co-Creating Community Economics as a Path of the Heart”
  • Working together, can we do more than just taking care than our respective unmoney “babies/pets”.
  • Going from niches to relevance.
  • Emotions in money experiments: dealing with fears
  • Crowdfinancing! technical development values based investing
  • How are other people designing an ecosystem of currencies to create engines of social action?
  • designing currencies as/like games
  • social ecosystem design and the use of currencies
  • work-share
  • micro credit;
  • time dollars
  • How to manage debt in a web based on distribution of small composable documents.
  • Ripple, Metacurrency, actual usage
  • What does unmoney tell us about changing relationships between incentives and motivation? How unmoney works as incentive and /or motivation
  • What does unmoney tell us about changing relationships between incentives and motivation?
  • How unmoney works as incentive and /or motivation
  • How do we teach about these alternative forms of currency and economics to potential early adopters?
  • Which of these different approaches are approaching reality?
  • What are the most pragmatic and useful? Who is making progress on deployment?
  • Teaching about money in a Sustainable MBA curriculum.
  • What kinds of alternative currencies are being used and thriving in local communities?
  • What are all the alternative types of currency – i.e. time banking, etc. Perspective of a young person coming of age and recognizing there are different ways to engage with money, currency and economics.
  • What is a sensible balance between social customs and accounting systems in the economics of the near future?
  • Currency backing methods
  • Mutual credit systems, small-scale democracy
  • What is the best example of alternative currency active today?
  • What is the best model that needs to be tested?
  • Where are the communities of trust willing to test a promising model?
  • Friendly Barter – A model of a cashless online payment developed with Tom Greco this last Winter.
  • How to share deeper value and wealth together and build an economy based on this sort of wealth.
  • How to share deeper value and wealth together and build an economy based on this sort of wealth.
  • Particularly interested in alternative and parallel currencies The potential for mobile phones to disrupt in the alternative currency space

UnMoney & NewWallSt

March 11th.
TEDx New Wall St.
re-imagining banking re-built for the Information Age in Silicon Valley on a New Wall Street, as described in the attached press release, and here http://.www.TEDxNewWallStreet.org

April 24th.
UnMoney Convergence
Fosters dialogue and collaboration among the range of interesting emerging ideas around money and exchange systems and to explore connections with issues of land and property tenure. In addition to topics on alternatives to the current currency systems, we invite all who are looking at new ways to look at land tenancy and stewardship, hard currency versus energy, time and food based currencies. We are looking for synergies between folks who see the need for more grounded, materially based economics and those looking at the spiritual, energetic and values based approaches.
Register here!
Website here (might be new in a few days).

On being an accidental NSTIC Pilot Yenta

The first person who I heard calling herself a Yenta was Deborah Elizabeth Finn who I met via my participation in the Nonprofit Technology world and the NTEN community.  She is “the Cyber Yenta” helping nonprofit folks figure out their technology needs and match making. Yenta is a Yiddish word for a woman who is doing mate matchmaking. 

[Read more...]