Proactive Development of Shared Language by NSTIC Stakeholders

This is the “punchline section” (in my response it is after what is below…the history of collaboration in the identity community):

Proactive Development of Shared Language by NSTIC Stakeholders

In 2004-5 the Identity Gang (user-centric identity community) was 1/10 the size of the current NSTIC stakeholder community.  It took us a year of active grassroots effort to develop enough common language and shared understanding to collaborate. NSTIC doesn’t have 5-10 years to coalesce a community that can collaborate to build the Identity Ecosystem Framework. To succeed, the National Program Office must use processes to bring value and insight while also developing  shared language and understanding amongst stakeholders participating.

Fostering conditions for high-performance collaboration

amongst the community to emerge must be a top priority for the NPO. One way to do this is to use methods that grow shared language and understanding such as Value Network Mapping and Polarity Mapping (more on them in forthcoming posts). The NPO with just a few staff could host many small focused convenings with stakeholders locally around the country and at industry events throughout the fall. With small collaborative meetings, and proactive support of network weaving [defined by Bill Traynor summarized by Eugene on his wiki] across stakeholder groups, I believe the community of NSTIC stakeholders would be in place just like the IIW community was at the first IIW. NSTIC must support self-organizing to create a thriving ecosystem through  shared language, understanding amongst NSTIC stakeholders by January.

 

Origins of Shared Language for Identity Collaboration

In the Beginning…

We (the Internet Identity Workshop / user-centric identity community) have been successful over the last 6 years in part because the format of many organic opportunities has shared language to emerge leading to greater and greater collaboration. The community began when some of us found each other at Digital Identity World conferences. There were only a few very user-centric focused people and we stood out amongst the enterprise oriented attendees. We liked each other and wanted to collaborate, so we started a mailing list together. Doc Searls asked a few people to be on Steve Gillmor’s Gillmor Gang December 31, 2004 and thus the “Identity Gang” was born.

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No Plancast you can’t have all my Dataz

You know I like social media tools and enjoy using them to share information.

I am also very conscious of the implications of doing so and how public things are when I do. I manage my public persona – the parts of myself that I share publicly on the web associated with my professional work and personal passion – User-Centric Digital Identity.

Today I saw a friend share via Facebook that they were attending a cool panel at SXSW – Demystifying Online Privacy and Empowering the Digital Self

I went over to Plancast where it was listed and also signaled that I would be attending THEN it asked me if I would like to share via Facebook. “sure” I think that makes sense – I learned about it there why not, it is part of my professional public life online.

So then the Terms of Use show up…and you know they are just too extensive. Why to post that I AM going to one event must I give all this information away. It is also a go-no-go proposition. I can’t “Uncheck” things I don’t want to let plancast do. THIS IS really broken. It needs to be fixed. I need to be able to use applications AND have control over how much they can do with my data and how much freedom they have to post.

I ONLY want to give them permission to post this one item…maybe in time I might trust them enough to have full access but that will come in time as I grow to know their service and trust their business practices.

Plancast is requesting permission to do the following:
Access my basic information
Includes name, profile picture, gender, networks, user ID, list of friends, and any other information I’ve shared with everyone.
Send me email
Plancast may email me directly at kaliya@mac.com ·
Post to my Wall
Plancast may post status messages, notes, photos, and videos to my Wall

Access my data any time

 


Plancast may access my data when I’m not using the application
Access my profile information
About Me, Events, Current City and Website

Identity and Personal Narrative & the Digital Age

One of the things you learn early on when diving into the subject of identity is that it means many things.
The sense of self is one of them.  Today I ran across this article via John Hage’s facebook.  Storytelling 2.0 when new narratives meet old brains.
“We are our narratives” has become a popular slogan. “We” refers to our selves, in the full-blooded person-constituting sense. “Narratives” refers to the stories we tell about our selves and our exploits in settings as trivial as cocktail parties and as serious as intimate discussions with loved ones. We express some in speech. Others we tell silently to ourselves, in that constant little inner voice. The full collection of one’s internal and external narratives generates the self we are intimately acquainted with. Our narrative selves continually unfold. [Read more...]

On Identity and Centralization

I was asked for a quote today to comment on F8 developments and the continuing apparent “centralization” of identity on that platform. It is not new for me to say these things but perhaps more crystallized…..

The turning point of the web becoming more social was mentioned several times today.

The issue at hand is fundamentally about FREEDOM: the freedom to choose who hosts your identity online (with the freedom to set up and host your own), the freedom to choose your persona – how you present yourself, what your gender is, your age, your race, your sex, where you are in the world. A prime example of WHY these freedoms are vital is the story of James Chartrand – you can read for yourself her story of being a “him” online as a single mother seeking work as a copy editor. Having a male identity was the way she succeeded.

We did a whole session at She’s Geeky the women’s technology unconference about women, identity and privacy online. ALL the women in that session had between 3-5 personas for different aspects of life and purposes. Many of those personas were ‘ungendered’ or male. I have not talked to many people of color about their online lives and persona management but should. I imagine that like women they choose for some of their persona not to identify racially.

Your “friends” shouldn’t be locked into a particular commercial context. This is where the work on client-side applications for identity management and social coordination for individuals are key. The browser was never designed to do these kinds of functions and I don’t think trying to make it do them is wise.

We need open “friend” standards where people are autonomous, without their identity tied to a commercial silo – like Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft, AOL, or any company. This is a vision of a web where I can “peer friend” my friends, and then no entity has power over our relationship. This requires people to be first-class objects on the web. Not easy to do, but essential for us to figure out.