I’ve co-founded a company! The Leola Group

Thursday evening following Internet Identity Workshop #18 in May I co-Founded and became Co-CEO of the Leola Group with my partner William Dyson.

So how did this all happen? Through a series of interesting coincidences in the 10 days (yes just 10 days) William got XDI to work for building working consumer facing applications. He showed the music meta-data application on Thursday evening and wowed many with the working name Nymble registry.  The XDI [eXtneible Resource Identifier Data Interchange] standard has been under development at OASIS for over 10 years. Getting it to actually work and having the opportunity to begin to build applications that really put people at the center of their own data lives is a big step forward both for the Leola Group and the  Personal Data community at large.

William and I met in September of 2013 via an e-mail introduction from Drummond Reed.  We started working together the day I met him on the efemurl project.  We were dating a few days later and a few weeks later we were engaged. We announced this during the closing circle at IIW #17.

The efemurl project was taking a extensively featured web platform William had built over several years and working to turn it further develop it and turn it into a consumer-co-operative.  The short hand way to describe, you know in that way they describe movie plots, it’s like Google and REI have a baby.  The core ideas developed for the efemurl platform will be brought over into the applications the Leola Group is developing.  Core aspects of what the Leola Group is are to valuable to be owned by one company and we will be working with Planetwork to turn the operation of those into a consumer co-operative.

So big questions for people in the community include:

Are you still involved with IIW? 
Yes of course!  IIW will continue and my roll with it will too. Phil Windley founded his company Kynetx and continues to be a co-leader of IIW with me and Doc.  We have a great production team lead by Heidi Nobantu Saul.

What is going to happen to PDEC?

We have worked to create a 6 month transition plan for the organization/community to new leadership.   We have brought on Dean Landsman (well known for his leadership in the VRM community) serve as Communications Director and among other things host regular community calls and host a podcast.  As part of taking on the Co-CEO role in the new company I have woven into the job taking the time needed to properly transition out of my role as Executive Director and work with the community over the next 6 months to get governance in line and then have that leadership group hire an new Executive Director. You can read more about it on the PDEC blog and see a video we made.

The organization just welcomed 11 new members. Dean will be presenting about his new role with PDEC at the Personal Data Meetup in NYC on Monday.

When are you getting Married?

William and I are getting married the weekend after IIW #20 which is April 7-9 (Yes, it’s way early!!!).  This will help friends coming for IIW from around the world being able to join in the celebration.

On being an accidental NSTIC Pilot Yenta

The first person who I heard calling herself a Yenta was Deborah Elizabeth Finn who I met via my participation in the Nonprofit Technology world and the NTEN community.  She is “the Cyber Yenta” helping nonprofit folks figure out their technology needs and match making. Yenta is a Yiddish word for a woman who is doing mate matchmaking. 

This last few weeks I have felt like a “Cyber Yenta” when it comes to NSTIC (National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace) Pilots because many folks have come to me to share their idea for a Pilot.  Given what I know from reading the NSTIC Pilot FFO and having attended 6 out of the 6 so far NSTIC face to face (I attended the last one virtually) events:

  • NPO Announcement
  • NSTIC Release
  • NSTIC Governance Workshop
  • NSTIC Privacy Workshop
  •  NSTIC uses IIW as its Technical Workshop
  • NSTIC Pilot Proposers day

They clearly want  to solve issues/challenges that are multi-party in nature where the $ will help to create incentives to do interoperability beyond what one company, organization or technology can do on its own.

Many of the people sharing bid ideas involve, unsurprisingly, their project being in the big part of a bid.  I listen/read and think… given potential purposes outlined in the NSTIC Pilot FFO (Federal Funding Opportunity) you know this one echnology/legal framework is one piece of what is a many-piece problem.  It is hard to dissuade them of that.

They really want relying parties, so if you come to the table with those, you are in a much better position.  They need legal issues solved along with technology ones.

I am not discouraging anyone from submitting a proposal for their technology/legal framework, but it would be helpful if people both thought about how they can be the center of their “own” bid ALONG with how they think what they have could fit with other organization’s companies bids too. How does your piece of the puzzle fit with other puzzle pieces. What do you have to give/contribute/share with others? How could you participate in a bid even if you didn’t get paid to do so?

It will be way easier for me to help network/connect across the landscape of potential bids if I know how you can play/contribute if you get a large sum of money (several hundred thousand), medium sum of money (tens of thousands), small sum of money (a few thousand), and no money/just participating (you just got new users pointed at your service that interoperates with a broader universe of relying parties, for example).

I have felt caught in the middle not wanting to lose trust by sharing things I shouldn’t about people’s ideas and bids, but also feeling like they need to connect and know more about others.  I am hoping that we can all put more information out there about how ideas for the ecosystem can fit together.  I also hope that people can be realistic about how they have key puzzle pieces, but not “all” the puzzle pieces.

 

Personal – a personal data service is LIVE!

It is a big day 11-11-11 for many reasons. One is that Personal emerged out of closed beta. Yeah!   When I first met and talked with Shane Green, I was so excited because I met a kindred spirit who shared core beliefs with the community around IIW (user-centric identity, VRM etc). I knew after spending 5 hours in 2 days talking to him that with his experience, personal leadership, and the funding they had already secured  (from Steve Case and others) that they were going to make a big splash when it finally launched.

As a bonus, the whole topic of Personal Data got coverage in AdAge yesterday mentioning both Personal and Reputation.com in an article:

Why Your Personal Data Is The New Oil

I think the biggest thing Personal has going for it its focus on design and usability.  Wire protocols (the technical bits of moving data and formatting it) are easy compared to how people can easily understand, interact with and manipulate the vast range of personal data they have, that is information which is personal TO them – not their tweets and photos that they proactively share, but all the “stuff” they should have a record of somewhere. Their car serial number, passport number, codes to garage doors for baby sitters and the kids allergies that need to be shared with playdates, school and the soccer team.

They are using OAuth, a key open standard, in their connectors linking information you have at one site to your personal vault in their store.

 

It is pretty simple when you get started.

1) You can add empty gems and fill them out.

2) You can share them with others… and also revoke permissions.

Anyone who sees a gem you have given access to has to agree to your “control” of the data and that when it is revoked they don’t keep a copy of it. They also can’t share it with others without your permission (you would give that other party access to your gem if you wanted to share with them). 

3) You can look for gems that have already been created by others about things they own or preferences/needs they have.

4) And get the mobile app.

Now that they have launched, I am going to dive in and start playing with gems and sharing relevant ones with friends and colleagues.

Other key items to note are the coming anonymity features they are planning on rolling out.

We believe strongly in your right to remain anonymous when you choose. At present, we only support remaining anonymous when publishing community gems, but will be rolling out new anonymity features in the very near future.

 

Please vote for my SXSW panels

30% of the panels at the SXSW conference are picked by people’s votes so please if you care about these topics and want to see them covered please Vote for Me!

Personal Data Triple Win: People, Business & Gov - Kaliya Hamlin solo short talk

Obama & NSTIC: All Your IDs Are Belong to U(S) - Kaliya Hamlin on panel with others

Let My Data Go! Open data portability standards - Kaliya Hamlin, Phil Wolff

Rules for Innovators of User Centric Personal Data - Mary Hodder panel organizer

Successful Unconference Patterns - Jennifer Holmes, Kaliya Hamlin